Tuesday, 2 June 2009

Discuss

This is a short post, that's because I have nothing to show for the last couple of days of hard work, you don't need to know that I have been woken every morning by a Song Thrush and you certainly won't want to here about the unfortunate Linnet I had to peel out of my car grill, so instead I have a question so I'd like you to do all the hard work in the comments.

How does your Insect/Moth/Dragonfly fieldcraft differ from your birding fieldcraft?

I suspect my pishing skills may be redundant on this one so over to you.

6 comments:

Stewart said...

Vastly. Its no good standing in the half light in October listening for Dragonflies or Butterflies for that matter. Call doesnt help here the half of my birds are located this way. Warm sunny days are a must, not usually the best days for birding.
You can often get much closer to insects though some of the Hawkers can be a bugger. I think photos speak for themselves. My butterflies are better than birds and dragons showing that they are more approachable. Just move slowly and watch where you cast a shadow...

Steve Gale said...

Well Alan, each 'group' has its own way of approaching the subjects; birds you know about; dragons, butts and moths generally allow a much bolder approach and the need to 'hide', pish or be devious often doesn't come into it. Plants are more of a challenge than you may think. Admittedly, they don't move, but they can be hard to pin down without precise directions, don't fly into view, or call, or sing and when not in flower can be buggers.

Alan Tilmouth said...

Interesting, my tinnitus related right side deafness no handicap when it comes to insects/moths/Dragons/Butterflies then. So weather requirements are different and I can worry less about blundering about. Surprised that neither of you mentioned location and does your 'eyeline' change depending on what your looking for or are you just finding these groups through general observation? I guess i'm thinking here that many of the images of moths/dragons insect are much mearer ground level whereas birds tend to be higher in certain habitat, e.g woodland.

Ian Fisher said...

Hi Alan, Most moth sightings usually come either from a trap and are the placed in a photo friendly enviroment during the daytime or as Stewart showed earlier in the year, from somewhere where they have been attracted to a light and are trying to hide (i.e. on the shop wall).

Ian

Stewart said...

Yes you need to re adjust your focus, its like switching between bush bashing for warblers and seawatching...

St said...

location -habitat does come into it.
I agree with Stewart about adjusting focus. Once you have your eye in, it suprises you, what you have overlooked.

As with most wildlife a slow and steady approach pays big dividends.